Scrum

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 Created dateCategoryArticle title
12017/08/06ScrumHow to create best 1week p..
22016/09/21ScrumSimplified scrum guide
32016/01/18ScrumGuideline to do scrum
 Created dateNameRecent messages

1.
2017/08/06 No.3 "Scrum > How to create best 1week plan for sprint"
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1 day = totally off day
6 days = the term when you can work for
The number of maximum tickets: 2 x 6 = 12
Maximum story points: 6 x 3 = 18

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2.
2016/09/21 "Scrum > Simplified scrum guide"
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1. Definition of Scrum
2. Scrum pillars (Transparency, Inspection, Adaption)
    1. Transparency
    2. Inspection
    3. Adaptation
3. The Scrum Team and its 3 Roles
    1. The Product Owner
    2. The Development Team
    3. The Scrum Master
4. Scrum Events
    1. Sprint
        1. Sprint Planning
        2. Daily Scrum
        3. Sprint Review
        4. Sprint Retrospective
5. If you want to learn more by yourself
    1. Certificates

1. Definition of Scrum

Original scrum definition document


Scrum is development framework within which people can address complex adaptive problems, while productively and creatively delivering products of the highest possible business value.
In order to make these things visible, Scrum Teams need to frequently inspect the product being developed and how well the team is working.
With frequent inspection, the team can spot when their work deviates outside of acceptable limits and adapt their process or the product under development.
2. Scrum pillars (Transparency, Inspection, Adaption)

In Scrum, decisions are made based on observation and experimentation rather than on detailed upfront planning. Empirical process control relies on the three main ideas of transparency, inspection, and adaptation.
    1. Transparency

Transparency allows all facts of any Scrum process to be observed by anyone.
    2. Inspection

Scrum users must frequently inspect Scrum artifacts and progress toward a Sprint Goal to detect undesirable variances. Their inspection should not be so frequent that inspection gets in the way of the work.
    3. Adaptation

Adapt based on inspection quickly
3. The Scrum Team and its 3 Roles


    1. The Product Owner

The Product Owner is the sole person responsible for managing the Product Backlog.
    2. The Development Team

The Development Team consists of professionals who do the work of delivering a potentially releasable Increment of Done product at the end of each Sprint.
Only members of the Development Team create the Increment.
    3. The Scrum Master

The Scrum Master is responsible for ensuring Scrum is understood and enacted.
Scrum Master Service to the Development Team.
4. Scrum Events

These events are specifically designed to enable critical transparency and inspection. Failure to include any of these events results in reduced transparency and is a lost opportunity to inspect and adapt.
    1. Sprint

The heart of Scrum is a Sprint, a time-box of one month or less during which a Done, useable, and potentially releasable product Increment is created.
Sprints best have consistent durations throughout a development effort (duration should be 1 week - 1 month).
A new Sprint starts immediately after the conclusion of the previous Sprint.
      1. Sprint Planning

Maximum duration: 8 hours for 1 month sprint (4 hours for 2 weeks sprint / 2 hours for 1 week sprint)
Outcome:
- Sprint backlog: What can be done this Sprint?
- Story points for sprint backlog: How will the chosen work get done? How much time will be expcted for them?
- Sprint Goal: What will we achieve in this sprint?
      2. Daily Scrum

Maximum duration: 15 minutes per day
Outcome:
- What did I do yesterday that helped the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal?
- What will I do today to help the Development Team meet the Sprint Goal?
- Do I see any impediment that prevents me or the Development Team from meeting the Sprint Goal?
      3. Sprint Review

Maximum duration: 4 hours for 1 month sprint (2 hours for 2 weeks sprint / 1 hours for 1 week sprint)
Outcome:
- Demonstration by dev team
- Revised Product Backlog that defines the probable Product Backlog items for the next Sprint
      4. Sprint Retrospective

Maximum duration: 3 hours for 1 month sprint (1.5 hours for 2 weeks sprint / 45 minutes for 1 week sprint)
Outcome:
- List up what was done well and what was done bad
- List up how to improve what was done bad as todo list
- Move what was done well as keep items

The Sprint Retrospective is an opportunity for the Scrum Team to inspect itself and create a plan for improvements to be enacted during the next Sprint.
5. If you want to learn more by yourself

First of all, you should read original definition document again and again considering your actual work. And aiming to get certificate will help you to have solid and proper knowledge of scrum.
    1. Certificates

Representative certificates
PSM (Professional Scrum Master Assesments)Exam base certificate
Certified Scrum MasterAttendance base certificate
PSM is good as certificate because it will force you to study and criteria is high (85%).
After at least you succeed in passing Open assessment, you can try PSM I and if you pass, you can get the following certificate and your name becomes searchable as a holder.


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3.
2016/01/18 "Scrum > Guideline to do scrum"
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1. Share the basic concept of scrum
  1. What is scrum?
  2. When should we use scrum?
  3. Principals of scrum
    1. Empirical Process Control
        1. Transparency
        2. Inspection
        3. Adaptation
    2. Self organization
    3. Collaboration
    4. Value based Prioritization
    5. Time-boxing
    6. Iterative Development
  4. Merits which you can get by scrum
    1. Adaptability
    2. Transparency
    3. Continuous Feedback
    4. Continuous Improvement
    5. Continuous Delivery of Value
    6. Sustainable Pace
    7. Early Delivery of High Value
    8. Efficient Development Process
    9. Motivation
    10. Faster Problem Resolution
    11. Effective Deliverables
    12. Customer Centric
    13. High Trust Environment
    14. Collective Ownership
    15. High Velocity
    16. Innovative Environment
  5. Roles
    1. Inside the team (Core roles)
        1. Product Owner
        2. Development team
          1. Definition (Source: Mplaza)
          2. No special titles (Source: Mplaza)
        3. Scrum master
          1. Scrum Master Service to Product Owner
          2. Scrum Master Service to the Development Team
          3. Scrum Master Service to the Organization
          4. Who Is the Project Manager?
    2. Non core roles (Source: Scrumstudy)
        1. Stakeholders
        2. Scrum Guidance Body
        3. Vendors
        4. Chief Product Owner
        5. Chief Scrum Master
  6. Scrum Artifacts (Source: mplaza)
2. The flow of scrum (Source: Scrumstudy, custom)
  1. Initiate
    1. Create Project Vision (Source: Mplaza, Scrumstudy)
        1. Inputs
          1. Project Business Case (Mandatory)
          2. Trial Project
          3. Market Study
        2. TOOLS
          1. Project Vision Meeting (Mandatory)
        3. OUTPUTS
          1. Identified Product Owner (Mandatory)
          2. Project Vision Statement (Mandatory)
          3. Project Charter
          4. Project Budget
    2. Identify Scrum Master and Stakeholder
        1. Outputs
          1. Identified Scrum Master (Mandatory)
          2. Identified Stakeholder (Mandatory)
    3. Create Roadmap (mplaza)
    4. Develop Epic and Create User stories(Source: Atlassian, Mplaza, Scrumstudy, )
    5. Create Prioritized Product Backlog (Source: Scrumstudy and custom)
    6. Form Scrum Team (Source: Scrumstudy)
        1. Inputs
        2. Tools
          1. Scrum Team Selection
        3. Outputs
          1. Identified Scrum Team
  2. Start of sprint (Source: Mplaza)
  3. Sprint planning (Source: Mplaza)
    1. Approve, Estimate, and Commit User Stories
    2. Create Tasks
    3. Estimate Tasks
        1. The term for story points to stabilize
        2. Story points poker
    4. Create Sprint Backlog
  4. Implements
    1. Create Deliverables
    2. Daily scrum (Source: Mplaza, Scrum guide)
    3. Groom Prioritized Product Backlog
  5. Review and Retrospect
    1. Convene Scrum of Scrums (Source: Mplaza, Scrumstudy)
    2. Sprint review
    3. Sprint retrospective (Source: Mplaza, Scrumstudy)
  6. Release
    1. Ship deliverables
    2. Retrospect project
3. Study of scrum
  1. Training and study course for scrum
  2. Certificate for scrum
  3. Reference for Scrum
  4. Circumstances for scrum
4. Agile
  1. Manifesto
    1. Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
    2. Working software over comprehensive documentation
    3. Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
    4. Responding to change over following a plan
  2. 12 principals which leads to manifesto
    1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software
    2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage
    3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale
    4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project
    5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done
    6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation
    7. Working software is the primary measure of progress
    8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely
    9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility
    10. Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential.
    11. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organising teams
    12. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.
  3. Agile Methods
    1. Lean Kanban
    2. Extreme Programming
    3. Crystal Methods
    4. Dynamic Systems Development Methods
    5. Feature Driven Development
    6. Test Driven Development
    7. Adaptive Software Development
    8. Agile Unified Process
    9. Domain Driven Development

1. Share the basic concept of scrum


  1. What is scrum?

A framework within which people can address complex adaptive problems, while productively and creatively delivering products of the highest possible value.
This definition consists of Scrum's roles, events, artifacts, and the rules that bind them together.
  2. When should we use scrum?

It is better to use Scrum if there are lots of unknowns, where the projects are more complex, difficult to define detailed requirements upfront and therefore to define estimates at the beginning of the project.

It is better to use the traditional approaches when there are few unknowns, project is less complex, easy to define exact requirements upfront and therefore easy to estimate and plan the project from the very beginning.

It is strongly advised not to start using Scrum until every role has received the necessary training and understands the roles and responsibilities.
  3. Principals of scrum


    1. Empirical Process Control

In Scrum, decisions are made based on observation and experimentation rather than on detailed upfront planning. Empirical process control relies on the three main ideas of transparency, inspection, and adaptation.
      1. Transparency

Transparency allows all facts of any Scrum process to be observed by anyone. This promotes an easy and transparent flow of information throughout the organization and creates an open work culture. In Scrum, transparency is depicted through the following:

- A Project Vision Statement which can be viewed by all stakeholders and the Scrum Team
- An open Prioritized Product Backlog with prioritized User Stories that can be viewed by everyone, both within and outside the Scrum Team
- A Release Planning Schedule which may be coordinated across multiple Scrum Teams
- Clear visibility into the team's progress through the use of a Scrumboard, Burndown Chart, and
other information radiators
- Daily Standup Meetings conducted during the Conduct Daily Standup process, in which a ll team members report what they have done the previous day, what they plan to do today, and any problems preventing them from completing their tasks in the current Sprint
- Sprint Review Meetings conducted during the Demonstrate and Validate Sprint process, in which the Scrum Team demonstrates the potentially shippable Sprint Deliverables to the Product Owner and Stakeholders
      2. Inspection

Inspection in Scrum is depicted through the following:
- Use of a common Scrumboard and other information radiatorswhich show the progress of the Scrum Team on completing the tasks in the current Sprint.
- Collection of feedback from the customer and other stakeholders during the Develop Epics, Create Prioritized Product Backlog, and Conduct Release Planning processes.
- Inspection and approval of the Deliverables by the Product Owner and the customer in the Demonstrate and Validate Sprint process.
      3. Adaptation

Adaptation happens as the Scrum Core Team and Stakeholders learn through transparency and inspection and then adapt by making improvements in the work they are doing. Some examples of adaptation include:
- In Daily Standup Meetings, Scrum Team members openly discuss impediments to completing their tasks and seek help from other team members. More experienced members in the Scrum Team also mentor those with relatively less experience in knowledge of the project or technology.
- Risk identification is performed and iterated throughout the project. Identified risks become inputs to several Scrum processes including
- Create Prioritized Product Backlog, Groom Prioritized Product Backlog, and Demonstrate and Validate Sprint
- Improvements can also result in Change Requests, which are discussed and approved during the Develop Epics, Create Prioritized Product Backlog, and Groom Prioritized Product Backlog processes.
- The Scrum Guidance Body interacts with Scrum Team members during the Create User Stories, Estimate Tasks, Create Deliverables, and Groom Prioritized Product Backlog processes to offer guidance and also provide expertise as required.
- In the Retrospect Sprint process, Agreed Actionable Improvements are determined based on the outputs from the Demonstrate and Validate Sprint process.
- In Retrospect Project Meeting, participants document lessons learned and perform reviews looking
for opportunities to improve processes and address inefficiencies.
    2. Self organization

This principle focuses on today's workers, who deliver significantly greater value when self-organized and this results in better team buy-in and shared ownership; and an innovative and creative environment which is more conducive for growth.
    3. Collaboration

This principle focuses on the three core dimensions related to collaborative work: awareness, articulation, and appropriation. It also advocates project management as a shared value-creation process with teams working and interacting together to deliver the greatest value.
    4. Value based Prioritization

This principle highlights the focus of Scrum to deliver maximum business value, from early in the project and continuing throughout.
    5. Time-boxing

This principle describes how time is considered a limiting constraint in Scrum, and used to help effectively manage project planning and execution. Time-boxed elements in Scrum include Sprints, Daily Standup Meetings, Sprint Planning Meetings, and Sprint Review Meetings.
    6. Iterative Development

This principle defines iterative development and emphasizes how to better manage changes and build products that satisfy customer needs. It also delineates the Product Owner's and organization's responsibilities related to iterative development.
  4. Merits which you can get by scrum


    1. Adaptability

Empirical process control and iterative delivery make projects adaptable and open to incorporating change.
    2. Transparency

All information radiators like a Scrumboard and Sprint Burndown Chart are shared, leading to an open work environment.
    3. Continuous Feedback

Continuous feedback is provided through the Conduct Daily Standup, and Demonstrate and Validate Sprint processes.
    4. Continuous Improvement

The deliverables are improved progressively Sprint by Sprint, through the Groom Prioritized Product Backlog process.
    5. Continuous Delivery of Value

Iterative processes enable the continuous delivery of value through the Ship Deliverables process as frequently as the customer requires.
    6. Sustainable Pace

Scrum processes are designed such that the people involved can work at a sustainable pace that they can, in theory, continue indefinitely.
    7. Early Delivery of High Value

The Create Prioritized Product Backlog process ensures that the highest value requirements of the customer are satisfied first.
    8. Efficient Development Process

Time boxing and minimizing non essential work leads to higher efficiency levels.
    9. Motivation

The Conduct Daily Standup and Retrospect Sprint processes lead to greater levels of motivation among employees.
    10. Faster Problem Resolution

Collaboration and colocation of cross functional teams lead to faster problem solving.
    11. Effective Deliverables

The Create Prioritized Product Backlog process and regular reviews after creating deliverables ensures effective deliverables to the customer.
    12. Customer Centric

Emphasis on business value and having a collaborative approach to stakeholders ensures a customer oriented framework.
    13. High Trust Environment

Conduct Daily Standup and Retrospect Sprint processes promote transparency and collaboration, leading to a high trust work environment ensuring low friction among employees.
    14. Collective Ownership

The Approve, Estimate,and Commit User Stories process allows team members to take ownership of the project and their work leading to better quality.
    15. High Velocity

A collaborative framework enables highly skilled cross functional teams to achieve their full potential and high velocity.
    16. Innovative Environment

The Retrospect Sprint andRetrospect Project processes create an environment of introspection, learning, and adaptability leading to an innovative and creative work environment.
  5. Roles


    1. Inside the team (Core roles)

The Scrum Team consists of a Product Owner, the Development Team, and a Scrum Master. Scrum Teams are self-organizing and cross-functional. Self-organizing teams choose how best to accomplish their work, rather than being directed by others outside the team. Cross-functional teams have all competencies needed to accomplish the work without depending on others not part of the team. The team model in Scrum is designed to optimize flexibility, creativity, and productivity.

Scrum Teams deliver products iteratively and incrementally, maximizing opportunities for feedback. Incremental deliveries of Done product ensure a potentially useful version of working product is always available.
      1. Product Owner

The Product Owner is responsible for maximizing the value of the product and the work of the Development Team. How this is done may vary widely across organizations, Scrum Teams, and individuals.

The Product Owner is the sole person responsible for managing the Product Backlog. Product Backlog management includes:

- Clearly expressing Product Backlog items;
- Ordering the items in the Product Backlog to best achieve goals and missions;
- Optimizing the value of the work the Development Team performs;
- Ensuring that the Product Backlog is visible, transparent, and clear to all, and shows what the Scrum Team will work on next; and,
- Ensuring the Development Team understands items in the Product Backlog to the level needed.

The Product Owner may do the above work, or have the Development Team do it. However, the Product Owner remains accountable.

The Product Owner is one person, not a committee. The Product Owner may represent the desires of a committee in the Product Backlog, but those wanting to change a Product Backlog item's priority must address the Product Owner.

For the Product Owner to succeed, the entire organization must respect his or her decisions. The Product Owner's decisions are visible in the content and ordering of the Product Backlog. No one is allowed to tell the Development Team to work from a different set of requirements, and the Development Team isn't allowed to act on what anyone else says.
      2. Development team


        1. Definition (Source: Mplaza)

Members of the Development Team are application area experts that are responsible for delivering backlog items, and managing their own efforts.
They should be cross-functional; being capable of doing the A to Z of the creation of each Product Backlog item. They should be self-organized; find their own way instead of receiving orders. They should be aligned with the goal of the project instead of working blindly.
A task might be assigned to a single member throughout the Sprint, but the whole Development Team will be responsible and accountable for that task; no individual owns any task.
The Development Team delivers the final product of the project in step by step Increments, as defined in the Product Backlog.
They always work in a product-based way.
It is highly recommended for members of the Development Team to work full-time in a single project, to stay focused and agile.
The composition of the Development Team should not change so often. If there is a need to change team members, thenthis change should not happen during a Sprintand there will be a short-term decrease in productivity when the composition of the team changes.
Scrum is mostly effective when there are 3 to 9 Development Team members.
        2. No special titles (Source: Mplaza)

You might have the temptation to give Development Team members more specific titles, such as designer, tester, quality inspector, and team leader; but Scrum does not allow this!
All members should have the same role, and the same title: Development Team member.
Scrum is completely depended on collaboration and team-work.
Development Team members should be united and completely aligned with the goal of the project. If you give them different titles or roles, they will focus on their own specific role in the project instead, and they might not pay enough attention to the final product which is necessary for agile projects.
Each Development Team member is responsible for all the outputs created in the Development Team, even though each of them might be focused on a specific set of tasks.
      3. Scrum master

The Scrum Master is responsible for ensuring Scrum is understood and enacted. Scrum Masters do this by ensuring that the Scrum Team adheres to Scrum theory, practices, and rules.

The Scrum Master is a servant-leader for the Scrum Team. The Scrum Master helps those outside the Scrum Team understand which of their interactions with the Scrum Team are helpful and which aren't. The Scrum Master helps everyone change these interactions to maximize the value created by the Scrum Team.
        1. Scrum Master Service to Product Owner

- Finding techniques for effective Product Backlog management;
- Helping the Scrum Team understand the need for clear and concise Product Backlog items;
- Understanding product planning in an empirical environment;
- Ensuring the Product Owner knows how to arrange the Product Backlog to maximize value;
- Understanding and practicing agility;
- Facilitating Scrum events as requested or needed.
        2. Scrum Master Service to the Development Team

- Coaching the Development Team in self-organization and cross-functionality;
- Helping the Development Team to create high-value products;
- Removing impediments to the Development Team's progress;
- Facilitating Scrum events as requested or needed;
- Coaching the Development Team in organizational environments in which Scrum is not yet fully adopted and understood.
        3. Scrum Master Service to the Organization

- Leading and coaching the organization in its Scrum adoption;
- Planning Scrum implementations within the organization;
- Helping employees and stakeholders understand and enact Scrum and empirical product development;
- Causing change that increases the productivity of the Scrum Team;
- Working with other Scrum Masters to increase the effectiveness of the application of Scrum in the organization.
        4. Who Is the Project Manager?

Now that we have reviewed all the Scrum roles, you might ask yourself, who is the project manager?
The answer is simple: there is no such role in Scrum; and none of the 3 roles of Scrum act as a traditional project manager.
Some people consider the Scrum Masters to be the equivalent to traditional project managers; but it is not true, because the Scrum Master responsibilities are very different than a traditional project manager.
So, a better question to ask is: what happens to project management?
The project management responsibilities are distributed among the three roles of Scrum and there is no centralized project management in Scrum.
    2. Non core roles (Source: Scrumstudy)

Non core roles are those roles which are not mandatorily required for the Scrum project and may include team members who are interested in the project. They have no formal role in the project team and may interface with the team, but may not be responsible for the success of the project. The non core roles should be taken into account in any Scrum project. Non core roles include the following:
      1. Stakeholders

This is a collective term that includes customers, users, and sponsors, frequently interface with the Scrum Core Team, and influence the project throughout the project'�™s development. Most importantly, it is for the stakeholders that the project produces the collaborative benefits.
      2. Scrum Guidance Body

This is an optional role, which generally consists of a set of documents and/or a group of experts who are typically involved with defining objectives related to quality, government regulations, security, and other key organizational parameters. This SGB guides the work carried out by the Product Owner, Scrum Master, and Scrum Team.
      3. Vendors

They are external individuals or organizations, provide products and/or services that are not within the core competencies of the project organization.
      4. Chief Product Owner

This is a role in bigger projects with multiple Scrum Teams. This role is responsible for facilitating the work of multiple Product Owners, and maintaining business justification for the larger project.
      5. Chief Scrum Master

This is responsible to coordinate Scrum related activities in large projects which may require multiple Scrum Teams to work in parallel.
  6. Scrum Artifacts (Source: mplaza)

Scrum artifacts results/products of our management activities are designed to increase transparency of information related to the delivery of the project, and provide opportunities for inspection and adaptation.

There are six artifacts in Scrum:
1. Product Backlog: An ordered list of everything (aka stories) that might be needed in the final product
2. Sprint Backlog: Selected items (stories) from the Product Backlogto be delivered through a Sprint, along with the Sprint Goal and plans for delivering the items and realizing the Sprint Goal
3. Increment: The set of all the Product Backlog items completed so far in the project (up to the end of a certain Sprint)
4. Definition of Done: The shared understanding of what it means for a piece of work to be considered complete
5. Monitoring Progress towards a Goal: The performance measurement and forecast for the whole project
6. Monitoring Sprint Progress: The performance measurement and forecasts for a single Sprint
2. The flow of scrum (Source: Scrumstudy, custom)

PhaseProcesses
Initiate- Create Project Vision
- Create roadmap
- Develop epics and create user stories
- Create Prioritized Product Backlog
- Form Scrum Team
- Identify Scrum Master and Stakeholders
Note: Creating team ca nbe done before develop epics. It depends on the organization and the way.
Sprint planning- Approve, Estimate, and Commit User Stories
- Create Tasks
- Estimate Tasks
- Create Sprint Backlog
Implement- Create Deliverables
- Daily scrum
- Groom Prioritized Product Backlog
Review and Retrospect- Convene Scrum of Scrums
- Sprint Review
- Sprint Retrospective
Release- Ship Deliverables
- Retrospect Project

  1. Initiate


    1. Create Project Vision (Source: Mplaza, Scrumstudy)

In this process, the Project Business Case is reviewed to create a Project Vision Statement. The Product Owner is identified in this process.
The Vision Statement provides a concise description of the goals of the project which help the team stay focused on what is important from the organization point of view.
      1. Inputs


        1. Project Business Case (Mandatory)

A business case may be a well-structured document or simply a verbal statement that expresses the rationale for initiating a project. It may be formal and comprehensive, or informal and brief. Regardless of format, it often includes substantial information on the background of the project, the intended business purpose and desired outcomes, a SWOT and Gap analysis report, a list of identified risks, and estimations of time, effort, and cost.
The project commences with the presentation of the Project Business Case. A business case is presented to the stakeholders and sponsors. The stakeholders understand the expected business benefits of the project and the sponsors confirm that they will provide the financial resources for the project.
        2. Trial Project

If feasible, a small scale demo or trial project could be run as an experiment to predict and evaluate viability, time and cost, risks, and possible effects of the actual project. This helps evaluate the practical environment and guides the actual project design prior to the initiation of the project on a full scale.
        3. Market Study

Market Study refers to the organized research, gathering, collation, and analysis of data related to customers preferences for products. It often includes extensive data on market trends, market segmentation, and marketing processes. Market study could also include an analytical study of competitors which provides better understanding of competitors strengths and weaknesses and can help decision makers formulate better positioned products.
      2. TOOLS


        1. Project Vision Meeting (Mandatory)

A Project Vision Meeting is a meeting with the Program Stakeholder(s), Program Product Owner, Program Scrum Master, and Chief Product Owner. It helps identify the business context, business requirements, and stakeholder expectations in order to develop an effective Project Vision Statement. Scrum believes in closely engaging and collaborating with all business representatives to get their buy-in for the project and to deliver greater value.
      3. OUTPUTS


        1. Identified Product Owner (Mandatory)


        2. Project Vision Statement (Mandatory)


        3. Project Charter


        4. Project Budget


    2. Identify Scrum Master and Stakeholder

In this process, the Scrum Master and Stakeholders are identified using specific Selection Criteria.
      1. Outputs


        1. Identified Scrum Master (Mandatory)


        2. Identified Stakeholder (Mandatory)


    3. Create Roadmap (mplaza)

The Product Roadmap is an initial visual timeline of major product features to be delivered and is normally created by the Product Owner;
    4. Develop Epic and Create User stories(Source: Atlassian, Mplaza, Scrumstudy, )

In this process, the Project Vision Statement serves as the basis for developing Epics. User Group Meetings may be held to discuss appropriate Epics.
An epic captures a large body of work. It is essentially a large user story that can be broken down into a number of smaller stories. It may take several sprints to complete an epic.
While the stories that comprise an epic may be completed independently, their business value isn't realized until the entire epic is complete. This means that it rarely makes sense to deliver an epic until all of the underlying stories are complete.

Gather user requirements, and turn them into deliverable features - these are called stories. Stories are normally written by the Product Owner and the requirements that make up these stories come from the customer.
    5. Create Prioritized Product Backlog (Source: Scrumstudy and custom)

In this process, Epics and stories are refined, elaborated, and then prioritized to create a Prioritized Product Backlog for the project. The Done Criteria is also established at this point.
    6. Form Scrum Team (Source: Scrumstudy)

In this process, Scrum Team members are identified. Normally the Product Owner has the primary responsibility of selecting team members, but often does so in collaboration with the Scrum Master.
      1. Inputs

Product Owner (Mandatory)
Scrum Master (Mandatory)
      2. Tools


        1. Scrum Team Selection


      3. Outputs


        1. Identified Scrum Team


  2. Start of sprint (Source: Mplaza)

In Scrum, we do not wait until the Product Backlog is 100% prepared with all the details to start the Sprints; we
can start the Sprints as soon as the Product Backlog is mature enough and has enough stories defined. We also keep updating the Product Backlog during the project.

An important point is that we do not change the items of the Sprint Backlog after the Sprint is started and the plans are set.
The Sprint Goal (discussed further in Sprint Planning) should not change either.
The Product Owner and the Development Team might try to clarify and re-negotiate the scope as more is learned as more is leaned about the items to be delivered, but will not change the Sprint Backlog.
Even the composition of the Development Team should not change during a Sprint. These constraints are designed to make it possible to focus and get things done.
  3. Sprint planning (Source: Mplaza)

The Sprint Backlog consists of the following:
1. The Sprint Goal
2. Selected items from the Product Backlog, to be delivered through the Sprint
3. A detailed plan for turning the selected items (stories) into Done Increment of the product and to realize the Sprint Goal
    1. Approve, Estimate, and Commit User Stories

In this process, the Product Owner approves User Stories for a Sprint. Then, the Scrum Master and Scrum Team estimate the effort required to develop the functionality described in each User Story, and the Scrum Team commits to deliver the customer requirements in the form of Approved, Estimated, and Committed User Stories.
    2. Create Tasks

In this process, the Approved, Estimated,and Committed User Stories are broken down into specific tasks and compiled into a Task List. Often a Task Planning Meeting is held for this purpose.
    3. Estimate Tasks

In this process, the Scrum Core Team, in Task Estimation Meetings, estimate the effort required to accomplish each task in the Task List. The result of this process is an Effort Estimated Task List.
      1. The term for story points to stabilize

The story points will typically stabilize between 3 and 6 iterations.
      2. Story points poker


    4. Create Sprint Backlog

In this process, the Scrum Core Team holds Sprint Planning Meetings where the group creates a Sprint Backlog containing all tasks to be completed in the Sprint.
  4. Implements


    1. Create Deliverables

In this process, the Scrum Team works on the tasks in the Sprint Backlog to create Sprint Deliverables. A Scrumboard is often used to track the work and activities being carried out. Issues or problems being faced by the Scrum Team could be updated in an Impediment Log.
    2. Daily scrum (Source: Mplaza, Scrum guide)

During the Daily Scrum, each member of the Development Team should answer these three questions:
1. What has been accomplished since the last meeting?
2. What will be done before the next meeting?
3. What obstacles are in the way?

he Development Team should also monitor Sprint progress each day and therefore it is a good idea for the Sprint board (wall chart) to be visible during the Daily Scrum meeting.
They can use a burn-down chart to track their remaining work and check to see if they are going to complete all items before the end of the Sprint.
    3. Groom Prioritized Product Backlog

In this process, the Prioritized Product Backlog is continuously updated and maintained. A Prioritized Product Backlog Review Meeting may be held, in which any changes or updates to the backlog are discussed and incorporated into the Prioritized Product Backlog as appropriate.
  5. Review and Retrospect


    1. Convene Scrum of Scrums (Source: Mplaza, Scrumstudy)

The duration of this meeting is normally four hours for a one month Sprint. If the Sprints are shorter then this meeting will be proportionally shorter.

In this process, Scrum Team representatives convene for Scrum of Scrums Meetings in predetermined intervals or whenever required to collaborate and track their respective progress, impediments, and dependencies across teams. This is relevant only for large projects where multiple Scrum Teams are involved.
    2. Sprint review

Demonstrate and Validate Sprint. In this process, the Scrum Team demonstrates the Sprint Deliverables to the Product Owner and relevant stakeholders in a Sprint Review Meeting. The purpose of this meeting is to secure approval and acceptance from the Product Owner for the Deliverables created in the Sprint.
    3. Sprint retrospective (Source: Mplaza, Scrumstudy)

This meeting is normally three hours for a one month Sprint. If the Sprint is shorter than one month, this meeting will be proportionally shorter.

In this process, the Scrum Master and Scrum Team meet to discuss the lessons learned throughout the Sprint. This information is documented as lessons learned which can be applied to future Sprints. Often, as a result of this discussion, there may be Agreed Actionable Improvements or Updated Scrum Guidance Body Recommendations.
  6. Release


    1. Ship deliverables

In this process, Accepted Deliverables are delivered or transitioned to the relevant stakeholders. A formal Working Deliverables Agreement documents the successful completion of the Sprint.
    2. Retrospect project

In this process, which completes the project, organizational stakeholders and Scrum Core Team members assemble to retrospect the project and identify, document, and internalize the lessons learned. Often, these lessons lead to the documentation of Agreed Actionable Improvements, to be implemented in future projects.
3. Study of scrum


  1. Training and study course for scrum

https://www.safaribooksonline.com/search/?query=scrum
  2. Certificate for scrum

http://www.scrumstudy.com/
There is free course and certificate.

https://www.scrum.org/Assessments
It is cheap but you have to get high score.

https://www.scrumalliance.org/certifications
It costs much because you have to attend the course.
  3. Reference for Scrum

http://www.scrumguides.org/scrum-guide.html
Basic principal

http://mplaza.pm/downloads/Scrum%20Training%20Manual.pdf
Good to pass PSM

http://www.scrumstudy.com/SBOK/SCRUMstudy-SBOK-Guide-2013.pdf
It looks that Quite practical guide for scrum but it got criticism, too.
Maybe considering mandatory items are enough.

https://www.scrumalliance.org/scrum/media/ScrumAllianceMedia/Files%20and%20PDFs/Certifications/CSM/CSM-Content-Outline-Learning-Objectives.pdf
The description on scrumalliance for Certificated Scrum Master

http://agiletransformation.com/
It looks interesting in practical view.

https://www.scrum.org/Portals/0/NexusGuide%20v1.1.pdf
Guide for management of multiple scrums

https://www.safaribooksonline.com/library/view/scrum-fundamentals-and/9780134000220/
Movies
  4. Circumstances for scrum

PSM I
For preparation, you should get 100% score for opne exam.
And you should read and solve problems in the
http://mplaza.pm/downloads/Scrum%20Training%20Manual.pdf
4. Agile


  1. Manifesto


    1. Individuals and interactions over processes and tools

Self-organization and motivation are important, as are interactions like co-location and pair programming.
    2. Working software over comprehensive documentation

Working software is more useful and welcome than just presenting documents to clients in meetings.
    3. Customer collaboration over contract negotiation

Requirements cannot be fully collected at the beginning of the software development cycle, therefore continuous customer or stakeholder involvement is very important.
    4. Responding to change over following a plan

Agile methods are focused on quick responses to change and continuous development.
  2. 12 principals which leads to manifesto


    1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software


    2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage


    3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale


    4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project


    5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done


    6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation


    7. Working software is the primary measure of progress


    8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely


    9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility


    10. Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential.


    11. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organising teams


    12. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.


  3. Agile Methods


    1. Lean Kanban


    2. Extreme Programming


    3. Crystal Methods


    4. Dynamic Systems Development Methods


    5. Feature Driven Development


    6. Test Driven Development


    7. Adaptive Software Development


    8. Agile Unified Process


    9. Domain Driven Development

















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